*Windows 10 growth slows to a crawl

By Declan Dunn   …..

It was destined to happen, the growth of Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system slowed down to a crawl in September 2016 according to several analytics service.

Microsoft continually bragged that the company’s Windows 10 operating system was the fastest adopted operating system it had ever developed.

Of course, considering that Microsoft gave Win-10 to users already running Windows 8, Windows 8.1 & Windows 7, that’s not much to brag about. Even more so with the aggressive push to install it on user’s machines, often times with out the user’s permission.

So, now that the free giveaway is over, statistics for September 2016 indicate that the system is not doing that well.

If you check the stats over on Netmarketshare you will notice that the service recorded a decline in use between August and September 2016.

For August, it recorded an all-time high of 22.99%, and for September a decline to 22.53%. Predictably, Netmarketshare recorded a growth of 1.86% from July to August.

Microsoft ended the free offer officially at the end of July, and now an update claims to remove the get Windows 10 malware from users computers.

Obviously, the effect of the ending of the free upgrade offer has caused growth to slow to a crawl. The one month delay in producing those statistics can be explained by how and when stats are updated by the services.

Sadly (for Microsoft) the growth in adoption will not pick up anytime soon. This is generally a slow time for sales considering the holidays are just around the corner. Microsoft may get a little bump in sales from the Christmas shopping phenomenon, but after that, adoption will continue to slide.

And if Microsoft fails to address the concerns about Window-10 having data security and safety issues, those numbers will continue to slide even more as users choose to remain with previously trusted operating systems for a while longer.

There are not many events in the future that could accelerate growth again. Microsoft plans to end extended support for Windows Vista in 2017, but Vista is hardly relevant anymore these days. Even if that would be the case, users might consider staying on Vista like XP users did years ago, or upgrade to Windows 7 or 8.1 instead.

It’s possible that early next year Microsoft may run some sort or sales promotion, or even another giveaway, but no announcements to that effect have been posted. Clearly, Microsoft blundered in it’s forceful rollout of an operating system that still contains flaws. And as long as the security issues are not addressed, and the whole rollout seems like a beta-test, then Windows-10 runs the risk of become as disliked as Windows 8.

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2 thoughts on “*Windows 10 growth slows to a crawl

  1. Well that was obviously going to happen. Win-10 is such a scary operating system the only way it was going to make it to market was through Microsoft’s unethical practices. of course the adoption has slowed, it’s not free any more. but I predict that MS will start it’s forced adoption and malware practices again in a few months when they realize the Christmas shoppers switch to a different operating system.

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  2. Yes, now that the general public has caught on to Microsoft’s near criminal practices, only those that got suckers or forced into jumping to Win-10 will stay, there’s no going back (for the most part). That HAS to cause a slowdown in OS integration.

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