* 9 scary personal details Google collects about you

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Our readers know that we have been warning about Google’s personal data collection since we went live. Google is, without a doubt, the worst offender of privacy online. However, we all need to wade through Google’s services from time to time, so we tend to ignore that simple truth.

And a huge number of people still use – and like – Gmail either as their main service or a backup. And if you use an Android device, you must have a Gmail account, but that doesn’t mean you need to use it all the time.

A brief glance through our listing of previous articles will show multiple times we’ve tried to help cure people of their Google addiction. Unfortunately, Google’s business model is about spying on us and reselling our personal information to whomever will buy it. And folks … there are a LOT of companies and government agencies that want to know about us.

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*Block Spam calls & SMS on Android with these five apps

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Spam used to be just about email (and that nasty canned stuff). But now it is following us to our smartphones in the form of spam-texts and robo-calls. You could opt for not responding to those texts, or answering calls from unknown callers, but then you run the risk of missing an important message.

Most of the time, it’s about things that don’t interest you or information or products you’ll never use. Nonetheless, you still have to deal with them, just like regular emails & phone calls.

Getting rid of spam calls/SMS on your Android device is actually as easy as using one of the following apps. These Android apps will help make those annoying calls and texts not show up in your inbox.

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* 10 cybersecurity myths inside corporate culture

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There are a lot of misconceptions out there concerning the importance of cybersecurity. Most people just hear the term and think it is someone else’s responsibility. But the most common misconceptions about cybersecurity may surprise you. See if you’ve heard a few of these myths and what the truth is.

Myth #1: The only worthwhile targets are large corporations

Everyone is a target and no one is immune from cybercrime’s impact. Of the companies that experienced cyberattacks in 2016, 31% were small and mid-sized companies that had less than 250 employees.

Myth #2: Users aren’t facing that many threats in a given day

The average organization with 1,000 to 3,000 employees will see anywhere from 11 to 20 incidents in a single day. Larger organizations that have 3,001 to 5,000 employees? Well, they’re a bit busier and see 21 to 30 incidents a day. The largest organizations that have 5,001+ employees will see 31 to 50 incidents in any given day, all according to McAfee Labs’ Threats Report.

Myth #3: Outsiders are the bad guys

Though you may not want to think about your own staff and users acting against you, it happens more often than most people realize. Roughly a third of all incidents are actually caused by insiders, whether that’s due to negligence, accident, or actual malicious intent. This number is backed up both by a Radware report and a study conducted by Verizon.

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*US Government starting to crack down on fake ‘tech support’ lines

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It’s happened to all of us … we click on a bogus link and up pops an equally bogus blue screen claiming our computer has been compromised and we need to call a toll free “Microsoft” support line to get help.

Then sometimes we even get a loud voice telling us NOT to leave the page or our computer will stop working. The voice is adamant that we must call Microsoft right then to keep the Internet safe from whatever bogus nasty thing has infected our computer.

Riiiight.

This is one of the most common scams on the internet, yet thousands of people fall for it every week. Of course it wasn’t Microsoft and the pop up was fraudulent.

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* Are average computer users a factor in the WannaCry ransomware attack?

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Cybersecurity experts are clamoring to contain the massive global ransomware attack that infected several hundred thousand computers over the weekend in more than 150 countries. While the attacks have mainly struck large businesses, should the smaller home user be concerned?

The attack that began on Friday — known as WannaCry — is believed to be the largest cyber exploitation attack recorded. It was responsible for crippling Britain’s hospital network and Germany’s railway, along with other governments and infrastructures worldwide. And oddly, Russia seems to be the worst hit of all affected countries.

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*Traveling With Your Laptop

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Many people travel with their laptop for work. And most of those ‘road warriors’ already know how to protect themselves while traveling.

But what about vacationing? What if you just can’t feel like unplugging for a few days? Maybe you have to stay connected for email, or news, or even (gasp) Facebook???

Fortunately, online connectivity and portable devices have made it easy to pick up our work (and play) and take it on the road with us. However, it’s crucial to find a way to make sure the personal information we store on our portable devices is completely protected from online thieves who target travelers.

If you’re heading out of town to celebrate the seasonal change, here are six essential security measures you should take to protect your device(s) and your information while you work remotely.

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*Extensive Breach of Medical Records Leaves 918K seniors vulnerable

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Cybercriminals want your private data … as much as they can get. Why? Because they can sell it to online advertisers (like Google, Facebook & Microsoft), as well as other hackers for all kinds of nefarious uses.

What we’re talking about is an extensive data breach that was recently discovered. A database belonging to the telemarketing company, HealthNow Networks, was found after being stolen and uploaded to the internet. The company provides equipment and medical supplies to patients with diabetes.

The personal information of nearly 1 million patients was left exposed online. Unprotected data included:

  • Patient names
  • Social Security numbers
  • Dates of birth
  • Physical addresses
  • Phone numbers
  • Email addresses
  • Health insurance information
  • Health condition information including medications and required equipment

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